Skip to content

Creativity for wellbeing

Home / About / News / Wellbeing News / Creativity for wellbeing

Published: 7 July 2021

Students writing

A 2019 study, the largest of its kind, found that creative activities like painting, sculpture and drawing have an impact on our mood.

Whether you think of yourself as an artist, love writing short stories, or enjoy singing in your spare time, you can boost your wellbeing through art.

How it works

There are three theories behind why creativity has such an effect on how we feel.

  1. It’s a distraction. This idea basically says we use it to avoid the stress we get from other things in our lives.
  2. It’s a thinking tool. Art can be useful as a way of finding some mindfulness. It helps us to rethink things and make plans.
  3. It’s for development. The idea here is that creative activities give us positive self-esteem, making us feel confident.

Some ideas

You might be thinking this sounds like a good idea, but you’re not sure where to start.

Try out some of these popular artistic activities and get a sense of wellbeing.

Journaling

According to a recent study, humans have an average of over 6,200 thoughts every day.

With so many, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to share them all. So instead, try writing them down.

This doesn’t need to be every day, or even using one style of journaling.

Try experimenting, create a bullet journal, draw a picture of your thoughts, or change the colour you write in depending on how you’re feeling.

Dance party

This is something you can do on your own or with as many people as you like.

Put on a happy song and for the three minutes, it’s playing just dance around your room.

It’s a great way to destress and get some perspective.

That’s because movement like dance releases your body’s natural happy chemicals dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins.

Photography

You don’t need to be a professional photographer or even have expensive equipment to try this one out.

Just use the camera on your phone to take pictures of anything that you notice.

The way to make this a mindfulness exercise is to go back through your photos at the end of the day.

Ask yourself how they make you feel. Are they happy or sad?

Think about why you took them and if they reflect how you were feeling at the time.

There are loads of ways to be creative, whether you try one of our suggestions or find something that suits you.

Simply treat yourself to a little ‘you’ time and feel your wellbeing grow.

Your Health and Wellbeing team are always here if you should need further support or information.

Book your appointments through Compass, email the team at londonhealth@sunderland.ac.uk, or call on 0207 531 7343.

Find out more by following #WeAreSunLon on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

ReciteMe accessibility toolbar button